Tag Archives: advertising

Reaching Beyond Who You Think You Are

6 Jun

It’s been three months since I posted.  Wow! I do have an excuse though.  BUSY!  Not only do I own Nosey Parker, create all the products and services for this entity, I also write copy for websites, helping businesses create action oriented messaging.  It’s something I do just for me because I really enjoy it.  Recently I’ve picked up a “music industry” account and it’s really fun, so totally different than all the businesses I’ve worked with in the past.  I’m reaching beyond who I thought I was and expanding my reach.  Getting into the mindset of a hip hop artist and their fans or a jazz musician and his fans, is not anything I would have imagined.

Here are a few tips everyone should keep in mind to ‘Reach Beyond Who You Think You Are” – whether you work for yourself or someone else:

  • Talk to everyone about what you do, it speaks to the passion derived from doing what you love.
  • Expose your talents to different people and types of companies you don’t typically work with or imagine.  It’s a great way to stay innovative.
  • Increases your marketability.
  • Totally makes you spit out a great elevator speech because the person you are reaching out to may have never heard of you or the type of work you do.  Nosey Parker is a perfect example.  Typically, men do not understand it at al, however they look at my work, see that it is highly creative and along with the rest of my resume, assume correctly that I can branch out to their business as well.
  • Deciding to quit a job or close a business is traumatizing, but it can be easier if you have branched out and created connections to use your talents in other venues..

I hope this was helpful.  Love to hear your tips as well.

8 OBSERVATIONS FROM WE2 – #1 Risk & Scalability

24 Jan

I’ve never had an issue with taking risks.  However, in my business (Nosey Parker), I meet women constantly in the small business sector who feel it was a big risk to just open their business – and it is.  Soon after the open sign is up, the fear of failing causes them to fail .. they stop taking risks immediately.  I also find that women mimic other women … if she can do it, I can too.  However, “do it” with a different product or service or audience.  Opening one more brick and mortar clothing boutique may be your dream but is it needed?  Are you solving an issue?  There is a difference between taking risk and just having the “I can do it better” attitude.  Many men and women do this because they think the person they are mimicking took the risk already by testing the market place (e.g group buying sites).

An overarching theme at WE2 was scalability, which implies that the underlying business model offer the potential for economic growth.  I get it and I can write volumes of my ‘potential’ scalability.  It’s necessary to show it in an attempt to predict failure, but the reality is that there are risk factors to predicting economic growth as well.  I am asking myself these questions:

1) Customer Behavior – Do they care? Are they retainable?

2) Recurring Revenue – is money being made while you sleep?  If not, then what is the plan to get them in while you are awake?  My model is transactional and I am now adding recurring revenue.

3)  Resources – Are they assets?  What is the value of these resources to growth?  Provisional assets will define your experience and delivery.  I learned the hard way  that there are “Ponzi Schemers” in the resource field.  Truly be careful, especially when the economy is on the skids.  When businesses need money, they will promise you anything to be your partner.

4)  Rank your daily activities – which ones are crucial? As Seth Godin says “time spent doesn’t equal success”.  I struggle with this.  I have been told by one of my partners that my value is needed in growing the company, not the daily grind.  I admit though that I am afraid that if I turn my back on the daily grind, what I have built so far may lose its position.

5)  Reliability – this is the nail in the coffin if you don’t get it right regarding partners and suppliers.  I receive resumes and business offers quite frequently.  In the interviews I conduct, I have started to ask “please give me your definition of reliability, examples of how you are reliable and three business references who can back up your reliability.”  Reliability = Accountability in my book and it’s a lost character trait.  I say bring it back!

6) Cost – Initial, ongoing, future.  I run a cash business.  It is a service and it pays for itself as long as I personally am involved.  The problem is expanding.  Planning the cost of growth was somewhat delinquent on my part, however I’m working on it now.

7) Change – this is vital.  No one ends up using their initial business plan. Are you flexible? There are aspects to my business that I am firm on because of the niche, however, over the last year I have made a few changes that give the business a bigger audience.  I know quite a few brick and mortar business who change their location frequently.  I’m guessing their leases are short term.  They blame lack of traffic 100% on location.  Women will drive up to two hours to shop at their favorite stores.  I’m guessing they need to spend some time on redefining how to reach.

8)  Confidence or Aggressiveness. Which one pays the bills? Being aggressive I say … ask Jennifer Hyman of Rent the Runway.   I loved her story about turning objections from clothing designers into creating a new market for them.   My “scalability” for confidence is off the charts.  This is a kill or be killed business world. I live in the Inland Northwest where aggressiveness is seen as bitchy, networking is opening yourself up to theft and being highly professional is not looked at as a good thing.  However, when I was at WE2, I had to laugh out loud at the aggressive behavior of the women attending.  I loved it … for real.  I was also wishing for an IV hook up to a few people – their blood type transferred to mine, not just for the aggressive gene but the luck and “who they know” quotient.  As I was waiting my turn to speak to Arianna Huffington, no less than 10 women stepped in and interrupted when it was my turn.  Being the southern gal I am, I just tolerated it and ended up walking out with her.  She was polite and informative … worth the wait and at the end of the day, I was aggressive enough and received the information I needed.  Yes … I’ll take aggressive over confident, some may argue it’s the same thing but I don’t think so.

Social Media and Direct Marketing Need Each Other? Yep!

2 Dec

This article is from B2C Marketing Insider and written by Debra Ellis – @wilsonellis.  I thorough enjoyed it and learned a few things myself.

Ellis starts: “External competition is good. It forces us to improve our game by rethinking strategy, honing skills, and working as a team. These benefits are lost when the competitive focus shifts from market share opponents to internal marketing strategy. It’s time for the sibling rivalry between social media and direct marketing to end.”  Continued….

My favorite statement “Just remember the next time you hear, “Social media is a fad” or “Direct marketing is dead,” from your competitors to smile at their ignorance. And, if you hear it from your colleagues, enlighten them. Your business is depending on you.”

Thanks Debra! Great article.

 

Are you using social media to find, enter and win contests and sweepstakes?

18 Aug

The ultimate perketing business…. Sweepstakes and Contests.  They have been around since biblical days according to The Contest Queen – Carolyn Wilman.  Her take on Contests and Social Media can be read on her blog – Social Media Marketing & Winning. Here is a little about Carolyn:

In 2004, after spending two years managing the backend of the business as well as being a stay-at-home mom, Carolyn took the love of her contesting hobby and combined it with her extensive marketing background.  The result was the first Internet-focused contest resource book in Canada called You Can’t Win If You Don’t Enter, released in 2006.  In conjunction with the book she launched the first contest resource website, www.contestqueen.com with links to contesting sites, groups and forums, contest management companies, contesting software and more. The American Edition of You Can’t Win If You Don’t Enter was released in 2008.

In keeping with her objective of teaching others how to have fun, she produces a free e-newsletter called The Winning EDGE that includes contesting stories, tips, tricks and links to new contests.  Carolyn runs workshops: How to Win Cash, Cars, Trips and More! and Attracting Luck for hundreds of people annually.  You can also listen to Carolyn online as she interviews the movers and shakers in the promotional industry and sweepstaking community on her Internet show; With The Contest Queen, or read her take on the hobby on her blog, From The Contest Queen.

Seth Godin Explains Permission Marketing

26 Jul

The man Business Week calls “the ultimate entrepreneur for the Information Age” explains “Permission Marketing” – the groundbreaking concept of marketers to shape their message so that consumers can readily accept. Whether it’s the TV commercial that breaks into our favorite program, or the telemarketing phone call that disrupts a family dinner, traditional advertising, for the hope that grab our attention away from what we do is based. Seth Godin calls this Interruption Marketing, and to discover as a company, it is not working anymore. Instead of annoying potential customers by interrupting their most coveted commodity – time – Permission Marketing offers consumers incentives to accept advertising voluntarily. Now the Internet pioneer is a fundamentally different way of thinking about advertising products and services.

Review for Permission Marketing : Turning Strangers Into Friends And Friends Into Customers – Seth Godin

http://www.amazon.com/review/RLY4RZYPCVJUP

Marketing Alternatives to the iPhone

12 Jul

from OPTISM:

Taking a look at things from the advertisers’ perspective, Marketing Vox asks Is It Time to Consider Mobile Marketing Alternatives to the iPhone? They suggest that “marketers might want to at least contemplate alternative – or complementary – paths to reaching the mobile space.” While display-based apps and banner ads are part of the marketing mix, they are not the only options out there. Marketers need to consider reach and although the smartphone and tablet markets are growing, there is a considerable audience without these devices that can be targeted. A permission-based mobile marketing service that utilizes SMS and MMS messaging can offer advertisers access to a mass audience. By taking it a step further, brands can engage in a dialogue with consumers, advertisers can be assured their messages are being heard – plus each conversational exchange enhances their understanding of their audiences’ preferences.

The release of research results from Harris Interactive created some buzz. Citing research findings, Internet Retailing reports that mobile marketing is influencing a third of U.S. shoppers to visit certain stores and “as many as 27% say it has also impacted their decision to purchase goods”. Once again, the importance of relying on subscriber opt-in is emphasized and the value of messaging is recognized: “An average of 40% of all cell phone owners say that texting is “extremely” or “very important” to them.”